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Talent Mapping Has Multiple Uses – Today SGA Talent Presents the Multiple Uses of Talent Mapping While Exploring “The 25 Best Tech Companies to Work For in 2016,

Talent Mapping Has Multiple Uses - It Provides Important Data Many Leaders Have Come To Rely On To Stay Ahead Of The Competition

Talent Mapping Has Multiple Uses – It Provides Important Data Many Leaders Have Come To Rely On To Stay Ahead Of The Competition

Click to see our July Study here.

Talent Mapping’s Multiple Uses

  1. Recruiting – Creates talent pools specific to a company’s recruiting requirements
  2. Sales, Marketing – Used to create specific lists of potential decision makers
  3. Talent Management – Provides a resource to compare internal talent to talent outside of the organization
  4. Competitive Intelligence – Diversity comparisons, reporting relationships Talent Mapping 

Talent Mapping is an effective research/recruiting method that supports numerous teams within an organization.  This process has been proven to create recruiting efficiency while ensuring completeness of the recruiting process. Talent Mapping goes beyond social media, and other research/recruiting tools. Talent Mapping also assists with opportunity hiring, future candidate pipelining, creating awareness among future high potential candidates as well sales, talent management and competitive intelligence. Talent Mapping offers names, titles, profiles, as well as relevant contact data to include emails and telephone numbers.

Today SGA Talent Presents the Multiple Uses of Talent Mapping While Exploring “The 25 Best Tech Companies to Work For in 2016, According to Employees”. As intended the study looks inside each company’s leadership teams and gives examples of how the data can be delivered to meet a leader’s expectations. As with our other reports our methodology included mapping out the leaders’ teams used to provide valuable information included in the study being shared. 

Enjoy the report and we look forward to connecting with you. Click to see our July Study here.

Thank you

Happy Hunting,

Sheila Greco

sgreco@sgatalent.com

 

 

 

 

SGA Talent Releases 2017 Chief Financial Officers Study

Today, SGA Talent Presents  A Look Inside The Chief Financial Officers and Those Who Lead The Finance Team’s at Fortune’s 250

SGA Talent Knows Talent - Who They Are - Where They Are & How To Gain Access To Them Recently we were asked to research the Chief Financial Officers at the Fortune 500 and Barron's 400. In an effort to complete this task we were required to create a comprehensive list of these highly skilled individuals as well gather profiles, emails, organization charts and more. Due to this, we decided to build upon our findings and release our study; A Look Inside The Chief Financial Officers and Those Who Lead The Finance Team’s At The Fortune Companies SGA Talent Knows Talent – Who They Are – Where They Are & How To Gain Access To Them Recently we were asked to research the Chief Financial Officers at the Fortune 500 and Barron’s 400. In an effort to complete this task we were required to create a comprehensive list of these highly skilled individuals as well gather profiles, emails, organization charts and more. Due to this, we decided to build upon our findings and release our study; A Look Inside The Chief Financial Officers and Those Who Lead The Finance Team’s At The Fortune Companies” SGA Talent’s Study, “A Look Inside The Chief Financial Officers and Those Who Lead The Finance Team’s At The Fortune Companies” is a 81 page report listing the names, titles and profiles  of those who lead these great finance teams along with many statistics surrounding education, career paths and of course women leaders too.

About The Study: Every day SGA Talent creates talent pools of skilled talent to help our clients recruit high potential professionals. Part of our job is to know where the talent is and of course who they are.  This month we wanted to highlight those who lead the finance teams of the Fortune 250 Companies. The Study Discovered Education is Important The majority of these Chief Financial Officers understandably have an educational background in finance, business, economics or management as well as a master’s degree in accounting or other finance-related studies.

It was discovered that of the 250 professionals, 127 had a Masters of Business Administration, with 32 having undergraduate degrees from a top-tier university. Additionally, it was uncovered that 11 of these very talented individuals have a Juris Doctor Degree (JD). The Study Showed a Professional’s Track Record Matters A big take away was that while education and the relevant qualifications are all-important, the quality of a professional’s working experience and professional track record is the strongest indicator for potential Chief Financial Officers.

The Study Uncovered That Chief Financial Officers Knows More Than Just the Numbers The role of a Chief Financial Officer today is not just knowing the numbers, but to know Shareholders, Employees, Operations, Products, Customers, Vendors & Suppliers as well. It became obvious when the profiles were gathered and examined. Women Are Making Some Advancements Within these Ranks We discovered 14% of The Finance Leaders In the Fortune 250 Are Women, compared to just 8.8% in 2010. As we identified all 35 women and reviewed their profiles it becomes evident why each has progressed to this level.

To download a complimentary copy of our report,  click here or visit SGA Talent Study Tab to do so. Enjoy

If you want to learn more about the study or are interested in the additional data that was gathered throughout the research process, please contact Sheila Greco, President SGA Talent – sgreco@sgatalent.com

Recruiting Kick-Off Meetings Are A Must

Be sure to implement effective recruiting kick-off meetings as part of your routine recruiting process. It pays off.....

Be sure to implement effective recruiting kick-off meetings as part of your routine recruiting process. It pays off…..

Recruiting Kick-Off Meetings Do Matter

Before we begin any recruiting project, even recruitment research assignments, we ask for a kick-off meeting prior to the start. This routine activity is a time where everyone can learn, share and discuss relevant information as well as discuss expectations. I believe recruiting kick-off meetings set the stage for the win-win partnership that lies ahead of the team.

Embrace Kick-Off Meetings

Recruiting kick-off meetings act as the first formal meeting between the client, their team and the recruiting team (s) for a specific assignment. These meetings need to be embraced, not ignored or taken lightly. It is a time to set expectations, discuss the recruiting process, a time to ask pointed questions, learn about the role, each team player’s responsibilities, as well as discuss other relevant information that cannot generally be answered from just a job specification or informal meeting. It is a time to build rapport between all parties, strengthen the relationship and quite frankly is the start of what needs to be a successful partnership that must yield success.  Therefore, the act of engagement before and during the kick-off meeting from all parties is a must.

Meeting Overview

Kick-off meetings are generally used to introduce the team, understand the search, the strategy, the process, the goals, set the timeline of expectations as well as discuss how all involved are going to work together effectively.  In effect, the recruiting kick-off meeting serves multiple administrative purposes. These recruiting kick-off meetings also establish communication protocols, discusses specific recruiting and interviewing processes. It is also a great time to discuss timing around start date and on-boarding. It is the time to discuss when to expect feedback from the hiring manager after a candidate has been presented, set dates for update calls with regards to the progress as well as a great time to talk about the target list, potential talent pool and how many candidates will be presented weekly. I believe recruiting kick-off meetings set the right tone for each recruiting engagement and should never be omitted from the recruiting strategy or process.

 

The Agenda:

The agenda should be kept simple while allowing enough time to cover the role, the process and expectations. Each item should add value to the discussion. Most importantly it is recommended that all parties are prepared. Often the recruiting kick-off agenda is developed beforehand and sent to all parties prior to the meeting. 

  1. Start with the introductions of each attendee while focusing on the role he/she will be involved with during the search. Allow some time to discuss past recruiting experiences that produced results, ones that worked well and should be mimicked.  
  2. Discuss and review the job specification in detail – Discuss ideal candidates to include, musts, needs and wants. Define the skills, traits, and qualifications the hiring manager is seeking. Discuss companies in which the client has had success recruiting from, companies of interest and those which are off-limits.
  3. Discuss the recruiting process details – Every client has a recruiting process that needs to be followed. If there is not a specific one in place, create one. There needs to be a roadmap to follow and stick to. Use this time to gather emails and telephone numbers of each team player so that communications amongst the team can be made quite easily.
  4. Set the expectations of each team player, discussing accountability and involvement – Be sure to communicate the role of each, timelines of expected reports and candidates as well as all follow-up activities. 

The Meeting – It Can Be Face-to-Face or Simply Done Over the Telephone

  1. Start on Time – To show respect for all parties involved, the meeting should start promptly. To facilitate this, it is recommended to send copies of the meeting materials in advance. This may include the agenda, job specifications, the list of those attending and biographies or links of those attending.
  2. Allow the client or someone from their team to drive the process and meeting –  During this time, typically the client will speak in detail about the role, the process and expectations. This is the time recruiters and those who are executing need to listen, learn and ask questions. 
  3. Recognize the fact that the kick-off meeting is the beginning of the recruiting engagement – An effective recruiting kick-off meeting presents a unique opportunity to establish the tone of this mutually beneficial partnership. For the client, it is a time to explain the role, the team, the company and the importance of the role to this hiring manager. For recruiters, it is a time to show the client you are an expert and you are the trusted partner who will deliver results by delivering interested, qualified candidates quickly. You are the recruiter who will identify, recruit and vet the high potential candidates your client so deserves. Now is the time to define your own responsibilities for the engagement. It is okay for you, the recruiter to “sell” but not oversell, the recruiting function to the client as a value-added service. Lastly, it seems logical to use this time to build trust between all parties involved. Game on!
  4. When the discussion is winding down, the recruiter can suggest he/she will send a follow-up email, recapping what was discussed – This ensures everyone is on the same page.

Happy Hunting and be sure to include a recruiting kick-off meeting as part of your next search engagement if it is not part of your recruiting process. 

Sheila Greco

 

Sign-On Bonuses Are Not Exclusive To Senior Level Executives

As The Economy Continues To Grow And The Challenges Of Recruiting Top Talent Remains, A Sign-On Bonus Could Be Just What Is Needed To Get The Candidate A Company Desires

Sign-On Bonuses Are Back

The purpose of a sign-on bonus is to lure top performers who possesses special skill sets or experience a company requires. For years this added incentive has been very successful for recruiting senior level executives as well as professionals in particular industries to include professional services, healthcare (nurses), technology (especially women and software developers) and financial services. But sign-on bonuses are coming back strong and are used for all levels of recruiting. Just last week Wells Fargo announced plans to sweeten recruitment bonuses to lure new advisers. Sign-on bonuses can be just what is needed to land a high potential candidate in this very challenging recruiting environment.  This type of bonus may be the incentive or an inducement to get a candidate to say “yes” to the job. 

Sign-on bonuses don’t necessarily need to be huge when enticing someone to join your company. Unfortunatatley for some companies and roles, companies may not have much of a choice other than offering one. For example, when a candidate’s acceptance is critical and the need to do whatever it takes to get the candidate on-board, offering a sign-on could get the job done.  But the size of the bonus can vary. According to an article in HR Magazine, the average amount of these bonuses ranges between 5-20% of a candidates base salary unless it is used for relocation expenses or a way to compensate a professional for money that may be left behind such as a bonus, commission, vacation or raise. Most of the time these bonuses are good for each party.

A Sign-On Bonus Not For Everyone

As we all know, a sign-on bonus is an expense for corporations therefore companies try to refrain from having to offer one, unless it is truly needed. Of course offering a sign-on bonus can motivate a professional to choose one company over another, but company’s need to be sure it is necessary before offering one. Before offering a sign-on bonus to potential candidates, hiring managers as well as recruiters need to seriously analyze the situation, the competition, the job market, and of course the candidate to determine whether a sign-on bonus is necessary before moving forward with one. 

Sign-On Bonuses Can Be Well Worth The Cost

Sign-on bonuses have been known to build trust, loyalty and can create long-term positive effects for employees who received one. Those who are offered a sign-on bonus often feel more committed and have a desire to do more. These candidates feel the company went the extra mile for them and they need to do the same. 

Just saying….

Sheila Greco

sgreco@sgatalent.com

 

 

Be A Talent Advisor Not Just A Recruiter – There Is A Difference

 

A Talent Advisor Is An Expert With Regards To The Industry, Company and Role

A Talent Advisor Presents Candidates Along With Narratives About Each Candidate, Not Just A Resume

A Talent Advisor Provides Information And Advice To Candidates Prior To An Interview

 

  

Not Every Recruiter Is A Talent Advisor, But They Sure Can Be Sourcing, recruiting, vetting and presenting skills are all critical for recruiters to be successful.  But the best, most respected and of course most effective recruiters can also lead a recruiting process, build and follow a proven strategic recruiting strategy start to finish. These types of professionals are better known as talent advisors and tend to be more strategic than the average recruiter. Talent advisors know the importance of adding value to the recruiting process; will always go beyond hiring managers' expectations while also acting as great advisors to candidates too.  Simply put, talent advisors are just more strategic, act as a consultative partner to a hiring manager and take the time to get to know their candidates. Talent advisors do more than the average recruiter. Talent Advisors Provide Hiring Managers with More Than Just a Resume Hiring managers know how to read a resume to look for the requirements and skills needed to do the job. This is a

Not Every Recruiter Is A Talent Advisor, But They Sure Can Be Sourcing, recruiting, vetting and presenting skills are all critical for recruiters to be successful.  But the best, most respected and of course most effective recruiters can also lead a recruiting process, build and follow a proven strategic recruiting strategy start to finish. These types of professionals are better known as talent advisors and tend to be more strategic than the average recruiter. Talent advisors know the importance of adding value to the recruiting process; will always go beyond hiring managers’ expectations while also acting as great advisors to candidates too.  Simply put, talent advisors are just more strategic, act as a consultative partner to a hiring manager and take the time to get to know their candidates. Talent advisors do more than the average recruiter. Talent Advisors Provide Hiring Managers with More Than Just a Resume Hiring managers know how to read a resume to look for the requirements and skills needed to do the job. This is a “no brainer”. But for many to make the decision to move forward or not, having more information is always better.  I believe recruiters need to provide commentary around each presented candidate and why he/she is qualified. I am not saying there needs to be a 2-page write-up but what I am suggesting is that there needs to be more than just a resume when presenting a candidate for a role. Some hiring managers make it easy for talent advisors and recruiters by requiring these professionals to fill out a questionnaire which of course helps with qualifying a candidate. But, when a questionnaire is not provided, talent advisors go the extra mile to provide hiring managers with information covering the candidate’s background, education, accomplishments, and why the candidate may be a good fit for the role not to mention, the company. Providing insight around a candidate is much preferred by almost any hiring manager compared to just receiving a piece of paper with information on it.  When a questionnaire is not provided here are a few questions I suggest asking a potential candidate; 1. What interests you about the job? The Company? 2. After looking at the job description or listening to the description I provided you today, why do you believe you are qualified to do the job? Talk to me about your skills, accomplishments and how they fit in with the requirements of the role. For some roles, I ask the candidate to take the time to write-out the answers to these questions.  3. Talk to me about your short-term and long-term goals. Where do you see yourself in 3 years, 5 years? 4. What types of people do you hire? Tell me about your team. 5. What is your current salary? What did your W2 state last year? Some candidates will divulge their salary without hesitation, while others are hesitant or not willing to disclose it at all. Personally, I almost always require a salary to be provided, before I submit a candidate for consideration.  6. What do you like to do when you are not working? This helps the recruiter and hiring manager understand a little about the candidate that is not on a resume.  Now I believe the talent advisor/recruiter has some great information to share with the hiring manager.  Preparing Candidates For Interviews Are A Must – Don’t let all your recruiting efforts be for naught, by not preparing your candidates. Your job is not done until the hire is made.  Please don’t fall short by not preparing your candidates for an interview.  Truth is, successful hires in part are the results of candidates’ preparedness. Talent advisors realize the importance of candidates’ being prepared for interviews so it is almost second nature for these professionals to take part in these activities. In my book, it is a must do activity and the fact that there is no one better to prepare a candidate for an interview than the talent advisor, is just a no-brainer. Stopping short with just presenting a candidate is like being short of a touchdown and not crossing over the goal line.  Preparing a candidate is not a difficult task, and does not require countless hours to do so just do it!  A Few Ways To Prepare Candidates For Interviews 1. As a rule, tell each candidate to leave an interview conveying a strong desire to work for the company while showing enthusiasm and how he/she can add value and complement the team.  2. Share with the candidates what you know about the hiring manager, the team and others to whom they will be meeting with. Encourage candidates to explore social media and conduct people searches on the internet to learn more about these professionals.  Additionally, simply direct candidates to the company’s website, yahoo news, and career sites to learn more about the company’s mission, corporate culture and values.  3. Have the candidates prepare by being ready to speak about their accomplishments, strengths and why they would be right for the job.   4. Tell candidates to be ready to talk compensation.  5. Most importantly, tell the candidates to be themselves.  Recruiting is not a job it is an adventure. Be sure your adventure comes full circle. It starts by finding the candidates and ends with a successful hire. Everything in the middle separates an average recruiter from a talent advisor. Be an expert, provide commentary and prepare your candidates.    Happy Hunting Sheila Greco sgreco@sgatalent.com  

Case Study – Client Faces Multiple Recruiting Challenges Requiring Multiple Recruiting Strategies

Not Every Recruiting Challenge Is The Same

There Are A Variety Of Recruiting Strategies That Can Be Customized To Each Recruiting Challenge – We Helped Our Client Recruit Talent A Number of Different Ways 

 

Sometimes even the best corporate recruiting teams need to outsource a piece of their recruiting efforts!

Sometimes even the best corporate recruiting teams need to outsource a piece of their recruiting efforts!

Introduction

Our client is an Entertainment Diversified Company which experiences annual hiring spikes, average turnover and anticipating several senior level executives to retire. Although promoting from within is always our client’s first choice they realized they needed to expand their search activities.  The decision was made to partner with us to execute a six-month recruiting effort to assist with recruiting for current roles as well getting a jump-start on future pipelining efforts.   Prior to coming to us our client created an internal team to assist with accomplishing these goals.  The internal team consisted of four senior level executives and the talent acquisition leader.  Their mandate, set by the Chief Executive Officer, was to hire qualified talent to fill current needs and to create a process that will lead to opportunity hiring and future pipelining.  

Our Client’s Recruitment Challenges: The Pursuit to Do More as Needed

Let’s face it, recruiting today can be very challenging in this very tight talent universe. A constant flow of candidates is not just desired it is expected. Companies that are often satisfied with current recruiting strategies and processes sometimes need to realize it just isn’t enough.   As with our client, the need to outsource part of their recruiting efforts became obvious. 

The Process: Methodical and Process Driven

For this client, we had to use a variety of recruiting strategies and methodologies to achieve each of their goals. Even filling the current openings required the use of two different strategies along with a third strategy for pipelining and opportunity hiring.

Current Openings: Today’s need for speed, efficiency, low cost and results driven recruiting mindsets often impact the recruiting process strategy therefore we had to employ a very methodical end-to-end recruiting solution that best fit our client’s needs. Recognizing this, our team and our client’s internal recruiting team, became a “recruiting machine” for the next six months.

Process:

1. Identify the Talent Pool: Our solution always starts with creating a target list of companies to recruit from and build a potential talent pool that best fits the needs of each role. As we began the process, our research teams began creating talent pools for each role, with the overall mission focused upon providing a talent pool of potential candidates. The talent pool had to be robust, filled with relevant, important, detailed information on each professional.  The data collected included, company name, professional’s name, title, address, telephone number, direct dial, email, profile and more. Our client expected this from us and we wanted to be sure we were very thorough with our results. As we told our client, we believe creating a strong talent pool of potential candidates sets the stage for the recruiting process and overall success. We believe it ensures the recruiting process to be a thorough one so that the recruiters working the search can present the best, the brightest and most qualified, interested, ready to be interviewed candidate pipeline. 

2.  Recruiting Process: Connect, Recruit, Vet and Present – For this client we had to use multiple recruiting strategies.

A.  Recruiting Strategy # 1- Two Very Specialized Roles – The Hiring Manager Wanted To Review The Potential Talent Pool Prior To Reaching Out and Apply Two Different Recruiting Approaches

With these two roles, the hiring manager wanted to be very engaged in the recruiting process due to the fact the talent pool was relatively small and the skill sets needed were very specialized. Our strategy for these two roles were to first create the talent pool and gather detailed profile information on each professional all of which was to be shared with the hiring manager prior to reaching out. From there, the hiring manager decided which approach the recruiter was going to use for each professional.

The process involved a “two-prong approach” to recruiting

Approach # 1 – For those who were qualified and seen as a great recruit, the recruiter was tasked with connecting, recruiting, vetting and presenting interested qualified candidates as they were identified. A very traditional, typical recruiting approach.

Approach #2- High potential recruits-  The less traditional recruiting approach was used. Our recruiting strategy for this approach was to have the recruiter engage in an introductory conversation with these professionals and ask if they may be interested in having a casual meeting with our client about a current role or potentially a future one. Unconventional, yet creative and yet very smart. This type of recruiting method allowed our client and the high potential client to get to know one another and to alert the high potential candidate that he/she was on the hiring manager’s radar screen. Additionally, it was the start of a relationship that could benefit both parties long-term. Needless to say, both hires for this particular hiring manager were the result of the nontraditional recruiting method.

B.  Recruiting Strategy # 2 – Filling High Priority Current Roles –  Team Approach With Our Recruiting Team and Our Client’s Internal Team – We Still used two different recruiting methodologies to achieve our goals.                   

As for these high priority current openings, our recruiting strategy was to “attack the roles” as a team and employ two different recruiting methodologies. It was decided to split the number of roles between their internal recruiting team and ours. For the most part, the roles we were recruiting for were at the Director and Manager levels, requiring specific skills sets, some requiring industry experience while others did not. Again, we started each search by having our research teams create potential talent pools and provided each assigned recruiter the information gathered. As for those roles in which our team was responsible for the recruiting, we were partnered up with a recruiter on their team to whom we sent the qualified candidates to. From there, their recruiters would review each presented candidate, have a quick call with them and then send them directly to the hiring manager. The good news for all involved is the fact that our client’s recruiting team had a history of great recruiting success so the process was relatively quick. It became obvious to us that our client’s internal team was strong, had earned respect and trust amongst company leaders resulting in the hiring managers’ confidence to interview those candidates the recruiting team recommended. It was nice to work with such a strong team.

Pipelining and Opportunity Hiring

As we all know the key to recruiting is to always be recruiting and a major key to diversity recruiting is to always be recruiting and networking. Therefore, recruiting efforts should be continuous.

Pipelining and Opportunity Hiring:  Long-term, continuous recruiting efforts have been known to reduced time to hire, reduced recruiting costs and provides access to an engaged community of high profile potential candidates. Those companies who employ pipelining and opportunity hiring recruiting efforts have discovered that these recruiting strategies help with hiring professionals who fit very specific roles and needs that may not always be for current roles, but future and/or anticipated ones.

Realizing the benefits of pipelining and opportunity hiring, our client asked us to help jumpstart this type of recruiting effort for the team. Our focus was to first create a target list of companies and then create robust, detailed talent pools focusing on functional areas where our client believed there existed future needs and gaps. The deliverable of the research portion of the process was provided in organization chart format and excel spreadsheets. Organization charts were at the request of the senior level executives and the recruiters preferred the excel spreadsheets because they can be sorted and exported.

In keeping with the spirit of recruiting and networking, I suggested that it would be a good idea that as their internal recruiter began connecting and engaging with these high potential recruits, that he/she is made aware of the fact that they have been identified by the company as such and the recruiter would like to stay actively connected with them. It was agreed upon that this would be done and their internal recruiting team began making their connections.

Once the initial connection was made with these high potential candidates, continuous recruiting efforts included monthly emails that were full of information about the industry and the company. Part of our continuing role with this effort was to create “recruiting-marketing emails” we believed would be of interest to those in the network.  Their efforts continue……

Need help with finding talent. Let’s chat. We look forward to it.

 

Happy Hunting!

Sheila Greco

 

 

 

Recruiting Should Be A Team Sport

Recruiters + Sourcers =  A Winning Combination

Becoming One Team Has Its Advantages

Recruiters Can Almost Always Use The Help and Support Of Sourcers 

Recruiters Can Almost Always Use The Help and Support Of Sourcers 

Strategic recruiting professionals along with anyone involved in hiring have come to realize the importance of sourcing and the many benefits it adds when it is part of the recruiting strategy. With the lack of qualified talent and overall talent shortage, having sourcing as part of the recruiting strategy and process has become critical to a company’s overall recruiting successes. Employing a team of recruiting and sourcing experts has proven to be the winning recruiting solution. Whether a company outsources a piece of the recruiting process or the entire process, it is imperative to employ a team approach to recruiting. The team approach is cost effective, efficient and delivers quick results.

Many will agree that recruiters and sourcers often share many of the same responsibilities but still have their own recruiting objectives and goals. But, I believe both need to know how to hunt for data, can create a strong, comprehensive talent pool, recruit, vet, network and present a slate of qualified candidates. In my humble opinion, I believe both should know how to do everything that is involved with the recruiting process end to end. This includes scheduling interviews, working with the hiring manager, the interview team and of course be able extend an offer and when necessary negotiate one.  Knowing how to do all the steps of the recruiting process and more, not only makes everyone more valuable but without a doubt makes the recruiting process more effective and seamless to the candidates not to mention even to the hiring manager. Recruiting should be a team sport with players having particular and complimentary strengths. 

The Differences Between a Sourcer and a Recruiter

Sourcers are known as having the ability and strength to identify hidden potential candidates that are not actively looking for a new role but could be good for a job they are trying to fill. Sourcers strengths include the ability create strong talent pools of potential candidates leading to strong candidate pipelines. Using social media to build a talent pool is typically the first round of sourcing, but beyond this know how to dig, hunt and identify talent by using traditional sourcing methodologies, such as the telephone to penetrate the companies where the talent may be. Basically, the goal of a sourcer is to identify passive candidates. Sourcers know how to find professionals not always found on the internet and can obtain full contact information on each professional gathered. Having access to passive candidates provides the edge recruiters and  hiring managers need  to ensure a comprehensive search was conducted.  

Recruiters, are doing some hunting but most often not to the extent of the sourcer. That’s okay when a team approach to recruiting is being used to recruit. Recruiters, in most cases work directly with the hiring managers, unlike the sourcers, and are involved more with connecting, recruiting,  vetting, presenting and reacting to active candidates. Additionally, many recruiters assist with defining, editing, understanding the true needs of the hiring managers’ requirements, which is required to recruit, vet and present qualified candidates. Yes, recruiters do some sourcing but often limit their efforts to social media. Not because they can’t do or don’t want to use other methods, but primarily due to the scope of his/her responsibilities and quite frankly due to work load.  All the more reason to employ a team approach to hiring.

Does your company employ a team approach to recruiting? Over the years I have seen the many benefits of using a team approach to recruiting. Hiring a team of experts to include both recruiters and sourcers results in identifying a high-quality talent pool that equates to a strong candidate pipeline and terrific hire. 

Recruiting As A Team Sport -  This allows Sourcers and Recruiters to be narrowly focused yet allowing each to pitch in when necessary, creating a seamless, cohesive recruiting process.

Recruiting As A Team Sport –  This allows Sourcers and Recruiters to be narrowly focused yet allowing each to pitch in when necessary, creating a seamless, cohesive recruiting process.

Keeping The Roles Separate: Some believe this works and it does, but there is a lot to be said for making recruiting a team sport.   Happy Hunting to all of you! Sheila Greco

Keeping The Roles Separate: Some believe this works and it does, but there is a lot to be said for making recruiting a team sport.   Happy Hunting to all of you! Sheila Greco

Organization Charts Display Important Insights Into A Company’s Talent & Inner Workings

 

Recruiting? Consider Creating Organization Charts To Get Access To Hidden Talent Others May Not Have Access To

 

Get it! Got it! Good! Now Share This Valuable Information With Other Teams Within Your Organization! 

 

 

Graphically representing relationships between individuals, functions and departments, organization charts are useful to teams within an organization for obvious reasons and very enlightening to those outside the company. Depending upon a company, its structure can be by function or product and reveal today's plan as well as tomorrow's too. These charts also provide the reader with valuable, quantifiable data, confirming or denying just a theory or providing information that is currently unknown. For recruiters’ organization charts assist with identifying talent others may not have access to. Increasing the potential value of a talent pool that may just be limited to public information.  A big edge for those looking to fill roles requiring a specific skill-set or experience. For years, strategic recruiters and talent acquisition leaders have used organization charts to recruit. Some limit the use to just current openings, while others find it beneficial for future recruiting efforts often used for creating relationships with potential future hires. No matter what the recruiting use, organization charts help anyone and everyone involved with recruiting to be more effective, smarter and more efficient.  Organization charts guide recruiters to becoming more effective with qualifying potential candidates. By having an organization chart is front of them during the time of an interview, a recruiter can ask pointed questions about the individual, the team and how the person compares to his/her peers while asking the screening questions necessary to vet a candidate. Taking the time to source and create a comprehensive talent pool to include building organization charts of the companies of interest, without a doubt makes a recruiter an expert. It ensures the recruiter and hiring manager that the recruiter made every effort to find, recruit, vet and present only the best candidates for the role. Organization charts without a doubt creates recruiting efficiency when the professionals identified have full contact information to include email, corporate telephone numbers, cells phone numbers and when available public profiles. We have discovered that by having all this information speeds up the recruiting process by at least 55%, allowing the recruiter to make a connection and outreach immediately a few different ways.  This can be huge when time is of the essence and hiring goals need to be met.  When recruiters do get access to organization charts, they don't have to limit the use to just recruiting. Often times this data is shared amongst other teams within an organization to include Sales, Marketing, Merger & Acquisition,  Business Intelligence and Talent Management professionals.  These charts can be used to analyze such things as diversity, competitive advantages, disadvantages, and simply reveal the structure or a team or teams.  We at SGA Talent find great value when using organization charts to recruit. Do you?  We have also helped our clients understand the inner workings of organizations by mapping them. If you are not currently using organization charts to recruit, you may want to consider it. If you are wondering how a company is organized, don't wonder anymore. Give us a call to see if we can help. It's time to be in the know with regards to hidden talent and more. Happy Searching and Sourcing !  Sheila Greco sgreco@sgatalent.com                        

Graphically representing relationships between individuals, functions and departments, organization charts are useful to teams within an organization for obvious reasons and very enlightening to those outside the company. Depending upon a company, its structure can be by function or product and reveal today’s plan as well as tomorrow’s too. These charts also provide the reader with valuable, quantifiable data, confirming or denying just a theory or providing information that is currently unknown. For recruiters’ organization charts assist with identifying talent others may not have access to. Increasing the potential value of a talent pool that may just be limited to public information.  A big edge for those looking to fill roles requiring a specific skill-set or experience. For years, strategic recruiters and talent acquisition leaders have used organization charts to recruit. Some limit the use to just current openings, while others find it beneficial for future recruiting efforts often used for creating relationships with potential future hires. No matter what the recruiting use, organization charts help anyone and everyone involved with recruiting to be more effective, smarter and more efficient.  Organization charts guide recruiters to becoming more effective with qualifying potential candidates. By having an organization chart is front of them during the time of an interview, a recruiter can ask pointed questions about the individual, the team and how the person compares to his/her peers while asking the screening questions necessary to vet a candidate. Taking the time to source and create a comprehensive talent pool to include building organization charts of the companies of interest, without a doubt makes a recruiter an expert. It ensures the recruiter and hiring manager that the recruiter made every effort to find, recruit, vet and present only the best candidates for the role. Organization charts without a doubt creates recruiting efficiency when the professionals identified have full contact information to include email, corporate telephone numbers, cells phone numbers and when available public profiles. We have discovered that by having all this information speeds up the recruiting process by at least 55%, allowing the recruiter to make a connection and outreach immediately a few different ways.  This can be huge when time is of the essence and hiring goals need to be met.  When recruiters do get access to organization charts, they don’t have to limit the use to just recruiting. Often times this data is shared amongst other teams within an organization to include Sales, Marketing, Merger & Acquisition,  Business Intelligence and Talent Management professionals.  These charts can be used to analyze such things as diversity, competitive advantages, disadvantages, and simply reveal the structure or a team or teams.  We at SGA Talent find great value when using organization charts to recruit. Do you?  We have also helped our clients understand the inner workings of organizations by mapping them. If you are not currently using organization charts to recruit, you may want to consider it. If you are wondering how a company is organized, don’t wonder anymore. Give us a call to see if we can help. It’s time to be in the know with regards to hidden talent and more. Happy Searching and Sourcing !  Sheila Greco sgreco@sgatalent.com                        

There Exists A Need To Close The Gender Diversity Gap In The Workforce

 

Women Still Struggle To Obtain Senior Level Roles In Corporate America

 

Although we want to believe there has been some progress with diversity in the workforce, it is obvious more work still needs to get done.

 

With March being National Women’s History month, SGA Talent, decided to launch a study to understand where women sit in the executive ranks of some of the biggest and best companies. Our goal was to gain an understanding of what is really going on with women in the workforce.

So for starters, SGA Talent decided to map out and take a deep dive into the 100 Best Companies To Work For and then compare the numbers to The Fortune 1000 specifically. This study focused solely on 9 key functional areas within each company, whereby identifying the leaders, teams and comparing the results to the companies researched.  

This study, based upon our research efforts discovered the following; (a) women leaders tend to have more of a diverse team compared to their male counterparts (b) it became very clear the specific industries and functional areas that are currently well represented by women (c)  women are underrepresented at the senior level and executive ranks of corporations and (d) these companies do have a qualified talent pool of women internally. Along with many data points, facts and figures, this report also includes the names of  notable women leaders at the companies researched along with biographies.  

So Where Or Where Not Are All The Women Executives?

 

Below are the number of women holding leadership roles at the 100 Best Companies To Work For. With 860 Executive Level Professionals Identified only 249 were women or 29%.

 Chief Executive Officer (9) or 1% 

 Chief Operations Officer (3) or > 1%

 Chief Information Officer/Senior Vice President (16) or 2%

 Chief Financial Officer (18) or 2%

 Human Resources (59) or 7%

 General Counsel Vice President Legal (25) or 3%

 Business Development (5) or 1%

 Marketing (42) or 5%

 Communications (45) or 5.2%

Foundations (27) or 3%

Below are the number of women holding leadership roles at the Fortune 1000

 Chief Executive Officer 7% vs 4% within The Fortune 500 vs 6% at the Fortune 100

 Chief Operations Officer 7%

 Chief Information Officer 13%

 Chief Financial Officer 10%

 Human Resources 62% leaders with over 74% women sitting in management roles overall

 General Counsel 31% vs 25% (Fortune 500)

 Business Development/Sales 4%

 Marketing 48%

 Communications 51%

Foundations n/a

As discovered in our report, there are many opportunities available to qualified women at some of the biggest and best corporations in America. Our research uncovered the fact that there is a large group of women employees at the lower levels of these corporations who present a very valuable talent pool of qualified professionals. Therefore with a little more effort and focus to close the gender diversity gap, corporate america can make this happen by making. it a habit to We look forward to discussing our study and our efforts with you. 

Reports worth reviewing:

 

Equal Pay Is Women’s Top Workplace Issue

McKinsey Report – Women In The Workplace

SGA Talent welcomes you to read our full report, just download your copy here.

 

 

Women are clearly a big part of today's workforce and ready to climb the corporate ranks. If a conscious effort to recruit and promote qualified women into roles which are currently male dominated, closing the gender gap can be accomplished. 

Women are clearly a big part of today’s workforce and ready to climb the corporate ranks. If a conscious effort to recruit and promote qualified women into roles which are currently male dominated, closing the gender gap can be accomplished. 

Recruiting Skilled Talent In 100 Hours

Recruiting Skilled Talent in 100 Hours

Hire Fast

Hire Cost-Effectively

Keep The Process Simple 

 

Finding and recruiting skilled, qualified talent is very challenging for companies of all sizes.  It is not just the norm for a specific industry, function or level. With low unemployment and a talent climate that is favoring candidates, without a doubt the pressure is on hiring managers to move quickly.  To help with this pressure, a fully engaged recruiting team can get the job done quickly, efficiently and without giving up on quality.  

With the average recruiting time of 18-21 days, this 100-hour recruiting model can work.  There is no need to cut corners with the quality of the hire and the recruiting processes it, it just means recruiting is a priority to all involved and a proven methodology will need to be adhered to.

Recruiting skilled talent in 100 hours is actually doable and simple: Believe it or not the process itself does not change from the traditional recruiting/search process, the focus is on timing, deadlines, accountability and quick results. 

Recruiting skilled talent in 100 hours fits nicely into the average recruiting time of 18-21 days. Most often in these scenarios, hiring managers will be interviewing interested, qualified potential candidates in weeks 3 & 4 or days 15-20 of the recruiting period.  

100 Hour Recruiting Skilled Talent Methodology

Goal: To create a talent pool of approximately 100 qualified potential candidates and present 3-5 candidates within 3 weeks (100 hours). 

 

1. Days 1-5 (40 hours)- Start with a Kick-Off Meeting – Every recruiting assignment requires a kick-off meeting to set the objectives, discuss responsibilities, accountability, the creation of the target list, recruiting strategy all while focusing on the ideal candidate(s) the client is seeking.  The first three days are critical for the overall success of the project. This is when the talent pool is carefully being built and the recruiting activities are at the beginning of being fully executed.  Overall, the goal for the first week is to create a talent pool of 60 to 70 potential candidates, all with direct dials, emails, and profiles so that each can be connected with at least twice, via email and Inmail this first week.

2. Days 6-10 (80 hours in ) – The recruiting process is fully underway and calls have been made to each in the talent pool. The goal for this time period is to actually connect, recruit, vet, network and present the best 2 to 4 candidates while adding at least 30 additional potential candidates to the talent pool so that the total will be at approximately  100.

3. Days 11-15 (Completing 100 Hours Recruiting Skilled Talent – Following up and wrapping it up – During this time period communication with all parties involved must be focused upon. Speaking with candidates, the hiring manager and keeping with the spirit of a cohesive recruiting team is very important during this critical time period of the recruiting process. For which the goal to achieve success has arrived with either a hire or close to having one. Team goals results in team successes and makes for a very happy hiring manager. Need I say more….

This aggressive, focused methodology is not new. All it does is put actionable, accountable recruiting parameters around timing, process and results.

Lastly let it be noted and openly discussed that our experience in professional services recruiting shows that recruiting skilled talent in this industry requires on average 160-200 hours of recruiting or 4-5 weeks with a talent pool of approximately 200 names. These numbers are more in-line with recruiting reality for the professional services industry.

Just saying….

Best regards,

Sheila Greco